Civil war reenactor dating sites

civil war reenactor dating sites

How do Re-enactors view the Civil War?

Brad Keefer, a 61-year-old corporal in the Union re-enactor ranks and a professor of history at Kent State University, said: “Re-enactors look at the war as a four-year period between 1861 and 1865 in which you can cut out all the stuff leading up to the war and very much ignore everything that happened afterward.” Credit... Credit...

Where can I find information about historical reenacting?

Youve found reenactor.Net -- the world-wide, on-line home of historical reenacting! H istorical reenacting is a great hobby!! And here on reenactor.Net, you will find information about historical reenacting all around the world. Now, youre probably thinking You mean like the Civil War stuff? Well, sort of...

Is historical reenacting a good hobby?

H istorical reenacting is a great hobby!! And here on reenactor.Net, you will find information about historical reenacting all around the world. Now, youre probably thinking You mean like the Civil War stuff?

When was the heyday of re-enacting the Civil War?

Many of today’s re-enactors were born as the last Civil War veterans were dying, and grew up amid the celebrations and re-enactments of the centennial that lasted from 1961 to 1965. But the heyday of re-enacting was the ’90s, during another moment of national fascination with the Civil War.

How do Re-enactors view the Civil War?

Brad Keefer, a 61-year-old corporal in the Union re-enactor ranks and a professor of history at Kent State University, said: “Re-enactors look at the war as a four-year period between 1861 and 1865 in which you can cut out all the stuff leading up to the war and very much ignore everything that happened afterward.” Credit... Credit...

What happened at Civil War reenactments?

American Civil War reenactment. Confederate reenactors fire their rifles during a reenactment of the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 2008. Confederate artillery reenactors fire on Union troops during a Battle of Chickamauga reenactment in Danville, Illinois. A young reenactor contemplates the Battle of Cedar Creek, 2015.

Are Civil War re-enactors conservative or liberal?

Politically, Civil War re-enactors tend to be conservative, perhaps a reflection of the demographics of a hobby that skews heavily white and middle-aged. But it’s not a monolith.

What is the most popular reenactment of the Civil War?

Some people, though uncommon, may portray Engineers or Marines. The 135th anniversary Gettysburg reenactment (1998) is generally believed to be the most-attended reenactment, with attendance estimates ranging from 15,000 to over 20,000 reenactors.

When was the heyday of re-enacting the Civil War?

Many of today’s re-enactors were born as the last Civil War veterans were dying, and grew up amid the celebrations and re-enactments of the centennial that lasted from 1961 to 1965. But the heyday of re-enacting was the ’90s, during another moment of national fascination with the Civil War.

Why reenact the American Civil War?

Reenacting the American Civil War began even before the real fighting had ended. Civil War veterans recreated battles as a way to remember their fallen comrades and to teach others what the war was all about.

When did reenacting start in the US?

History. Modern reenacting is thought to have begun during the 1961–1965 Civil War Centennial commemorations. Reenacting grew in popularity during the 1980s and 1990s, due in large part to the success of the 125th Anniversary reenactment near the original Manassas battlefield, which was attended by more than 6,000 reenactors.

When did reenacting the Battle of Gettysburg start?

The Great Reunion of 1913, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, was attended by more than 50,000 Union and Confederate veterans, and included reenactments of elements of the battle, including Picketts Charge. Modern reenacting is thought to have begun during the 1961–1965 Civil War Centennial commemorations.

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